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Force delivery properties of thermoplastic orthodontic materials

  • Jae-Sung Kwon
    Affiliations
    Graduate student, Department of Dental Biomaterial Science, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
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  • Yong-Keun Lee
    Correspondence
    Reprint requests to: Yong-Keun Lee, Department of Dental Biomaterial Science, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, 28 Yeongeon-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul, Korea
    Affiliations
    Professor, Department of Dental Biomaterial Science and Dental Research Institute, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
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  • Bum-Soon Lim
    Affiliations
    Professor, Department of Dental Biomaterial Science, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
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  • Yong-Kyu Lim
    Affiliations
    Associate professor, Department of Orthodontics, Graduate School of Clinical Dentistry, Korea University, Seoul, Korea.
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      Introduction: Our objectives were to evaluate the force and energy (resilience) delivery properties of thermoplastic overlay orthodontic materials and to determine the changes in force delivery properties after thermocycling or repeated load cycling. Methods: Three types and 3 thicknesses of materials were investigated. Three-point bending-recovery tests were performed at baseline and after cycling procedures. For cycling, the specimens were thermocycled for 1000 cycles or repeatedly deflected by 1 mm for 100 cycles. Vickers hardness was measured to determine the changes after thermocycling or repeated load cycling. Results: The amount of deflection for optimal force delivery was 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Thin material exerted high energy in the deflection range of optimal force delivery. In the deflection ranges of optimal force delivery (0.2-0.5 mm), the force delivery properties after thermocycling were not different from those at the baseline (P >.01) but were different after repeated load cycling (P <.01). Thermocycling and repeated load cycling influenced Vickers hardness significantly. Conclusions: Thin material (0.508 mm) can deliver higher energy than thick materials (0.762 or 1.016 mm, P <.01) of the same brand. Therefore, thin material should be selected in the same brand of material. The effect of repeated deflection during service should be considered.
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